Tagged: kickstarter

Kickstarter I’m Backing – Thornwatch

And lo, the gaming gods didst smile upon the gamers, and there was much rejoicing!

Hello! And welcome back after a month or so hiatus. I return to blogging with a Kickstarter I have been anticipating for months, probably over a year: THORNWATCH.

Thornwatch Kickstarter

Over the past few years, Gabe and Tycho of Penny Arcade have created the Eyrewood, a mystical place where magical guardians, called the Thornwatch, patrol the enchanted woods and protect the denizens therein from creatures changed and mutated by the dark mystical force, the Ebb.

Along with the Guardians of the Thornwatch are the Lookouts, Guardians in training, and the Daughters, girls that are pulled into the Eyrewood and imbued with power.

I’ve been hooked since the debut of the Eyrewood as an idea, and then a full fledged universe with backstory, history, some recurring characters, and amazing monsters. It is such a neat concept outside of what we normally look at as fantasy. I love the art, especially for monsters like The Choir. Penny Arcade has made numerous online comics, as well as digital comics on Comixology.

Thornwatch Kickstarter 2

In the game, you choose one of five characters that come with their own 30 card deck. One person is the Judge (game master) and represents the Judging Wood. The Thornwatch players choose a mission, and then immediately get into the action on a comic-book style game board.

From the video on their Kickstarter, there is no leveling up as your are already a powerful master of your art as a Guardian of the Thornwatch.

I was fortunate enough to get a quick playtest game in at the Lone Shark Games booth at GenCon this year. My friends and I had a blast with just the quick, basic game the demo guy showed us. The card decks and how attacks and such were determined were fast paced and very easy to learn.

I backed at the $88 level. (If I backed at anything higher I think my wife would have a conniption.) I hope you, dear reader, will also back this Kickstarter, even if it’s at the $3 level…but I recommend getting the game. You and your friends will have hours of adventuring fun.

So head over to Kickstarter and check it out!

Until next time!…

(Note: All images herein are (C) Copyright Penny Arcade and Lone Shark Games. The images and references to their material is posted purely for this blog and is not intended for sale or any other profit making purpose.)

 

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Geekery – My Rediscovered Love of Dropzone Commander

Twas a glorious four days in August of 2014 when my wife, daughter, and brother made the long, arduous trek to Indianapolis, Indiana for Gen Con 2014.

I went.

I saw.

I gamed.

I have a blog post about it somewhere around here…

During the best four days in gaming in 2014, my brother and I went “halvsies” on the Dropzone Commander two-player starter box. I was immediately intrigued by the game with its miniatures engineered to fit together. Most of the dropships could actually carry the vehicles they were meant to. Everything fit perfectly. The designers are lifelong geeks, and they were, and still are, dedicated to that level of detail.

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The universe itself is incredible. The story of Dropzone Commander begins with D+250 with humanity, under the United Colonies of Man, fighting the vile, parasitic Scourge to take back the fertile cradle worlds, the most important of which is Earth itself. In the midst of the chaos are the Resistance fighters on each world, some friendly to the UCM, some fighting for their own power. The clan-like Shaltari, once friends to humanity, now fight for their own aims. The Post Human Republic, a race of advanced humans, fight the UCM and the Scourge, but to what ends only they know.

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The gameplay is awesome. It is fast and common sense, yet still dynamic enough to force the commander (player) to sit and think of their tactics, and overall strategy. I have played 700 point games in an hour and a half, and that is quite a few models on the board. I cannot wait to play larger 1,000 to 2,000 point games.

DZC 12

The group I play with doesn’t know the love and joy of Classic Battletech, but I constantly tell them that Dropzone Commander is what Battletech: Alpha Strike should have been. Not the models or the universe, of course, but the rules and playability. While I’m sure playing enough Alpha Strike will help keep the rules fresh in one’s mind, they are easily forgotten. I hadn’t played a game of Dropzone Commander in a year and a half, and I still remembered 90% of the rules. (It had been a busy year and a half, and all gaming went to the wayside with family, moving homes, our wedding, and work commitments.)

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I wonder what would happen if Catalyst Game Labs got license to use the DZC system…

Things that make you go: hmm…

On top of it all, Hawk Wargames, the company that makes DZC, keeps their miniatures relatively cheap. I can get a handful of miniatures for $30-$40. This is great for a family man on a budget. I can slowly but surely build the army I want. It may take a month or two, but it’s not like Warhammer 40K where just one squad, or miniature, can wipe out a man’s gaming budget for the month. In fact, the cost of getting started in DZC is $44 for a starter set, which gives you from 540 to about 600 points, depending on the faction.

Even the books are cheap. I can get the first expansion book, “Reconquest: Phase 1”, for about $20 on Miniature Market. That’s a lot better than the $40-$60 I would drop for Battletech’s latest rulebooks.

Below are some pictures of my most recent game (two weeks ago) between my Scourge and an opponent’s UCM.

Though I lost, my Scourge put up one hell of a fight!

Hawk Wargames recently wrapped up a Kickstarter for their space ship battles game, Dropfleet Commander. The smallest ship carries 100 dropships. That is an insane scale. What’s even better is that Dropfleet Commander and Dropzone Commander will be playable together. Talk about epic scale!

I highly recommend Dropzone Commander to anyone who loves miniature wargames on a large scale.

And if you want a play a game with me, I am usually at the Game Shoppe in Bellevue, Nebraska on Thursday nights.

Until next time…

Kickstarter I’m Backing – Rail Raiders Infinite

I don’t normally back Kickstarters. My money tends to go to a specific amount of gaming each paycheck. Like recently, one paycheck went to purchase Saber Heavy Grav Tanks and Razorworms for my Scourge force for Dropzone Commander. Another paycheck went to purchase a Gekko Squadron for my Infinity Nomads. Having a family reduces miniature wargame spend significantly.

So when I do back a Kickstarter it is a special occasion.

To begin, let me ask you a few questions.

Do you like Firefly?

Do you like Wild West Exodus?

Do you like Chibis?

If you answered yes to all (or at least one) of those questions, then Rail Raiders Infinite is for you.

Rail Raiders Infinite is a table top miniature game from Soda Pop Miniatures and Ninja Division where you and your friends play as chibi raiders in a sci-fi western universe and attempt to rob a space train. (Right? Sure.) But beware! Law bots and marshals fill the train and will attempt to stop you. Do you have what it takes?

All salesmanship aside, this game looks like a blast. I am told Soda Pop Miniatures and Ninja Division put out some great games. I love the look and feel of this game. It is very Firefly-esque. And the law bots are something right out of Wild West Exodus. It looks fun and funny and I can’t wait to play it. (Maybe in October 2016? Sure. I’ll believe them…for now. Let’s just hope they’re not like Drake II…)

Even some of the raiders are hilarious. Stretch goal “Canton Cobb” is an ode to Jayne Cobb from Firefly, and “The Typhoon” is Vash the Stampede.

The train itself is a series of tiles. Instead of normal dice, the face of the dice are card faces (10, Jack, King, Queen, and Joker). And there are coins. Coins make every game better, right? Right.

It makes me smile. ūüôā

Don’t believe me that this is a great game? (Or looks like a great game!?)¬†Head over to Kickstarter and check it out now!

And give them $50.

Until next time!…

We’ll Call This Progress

So I’ve made some decent progress on getting Ship Strike ready:

20140612_214646Box full of completed tiles, and some uncompleted. CSM added for scale.

20140612_214629Level 1 crates (all 21 of them) and tiles that I’ll work on tomorrow…along with my mess.

Progress seems slow. But I have to remember I’m the only one working on this.

That said, using foam core instead of cardboard has been a great improvement over the cardboard I was trying to scrap from boxes and packages we had lying around the house. Though not pristine, edges are cleaner. I printed the tiles onto cardstock instead of using graph paper, making the tiles themselves look cleaner.

So where do I go from here? First I will finish cutting the foam core and gluing on squares. I actually have doors and stuff so I need to make those, too. Then comes the really hard part: making cut-outs of the dudes (read: miniatures).

Dudes are important for this game.

They are sorta the focus.

Hard to play a miniature wargame without your dudes/dudettes. (Disclaimer: Ship Strike is an Equal Opportunity game)

I’ve considered purchasing and painting up some cheap minis from somewhere, but I’m not sure where to look and I’d hate to pitch this to a big company and have them look down on, or even reject, my game because I’m using someone else’s – perhaps even a competitor’s – models. I’m not sure what route to go there. If anyone with real industry knowledge/experience has input on that I would greatly appreciate it.

And then more playtesting. While I’ve firmed up the rules for the most part, and the troops for each faction are pretty tight, there is always room for improvement. And you¬† never know when something will come up where you and your playtesters will go,”What the deuce?!”

I have also decided to post the rules on the http://www.boardgamegeek.com forums.

Many people worry about piracy and having their idea stolen, and I had this worry, too. But Adam Ferrel, creator of the game Havok and Hijinks, made an excellent point on The Cardboard Republic podcast when he was asked about it. First, Adam stated that he didn’t believe piracy really existed. If someone snagged and played his game for free, oh well. But he made a much more important observation. He stated there are three types of gamers.

First, those who would never buy the game. They would print off his rules and cards and play for free forever. And he doesn’t care. He’s just happy someone is enjoying his game.

Which leads to the second category of gamer, those who will first play it for free, and then go out and purchase it. Whether they download and print everything themselves, or are introduced to the game by a will-never-buy-friend, this individual will, theoretically, become a customer.

And finally there is the gamer that will always buy the game to support the creator and to get all the cool stuff you don’t get when you print and play.

In Adam Ferrel’s mind, all three types of gamers are good for his game. Word of mouth and PnP gaming sessions will spread news of his game and increase its popularity.

I’m inclined to agree with Adam Ferrel.

The Ship Strike rules will be posted in the next day or so after I give them a once over and ensure the majority of spelling errors are corrected, and that any changes to rules/stats are updated in the official documents and not just my notes.

It’s all coming along, and I’m getting really excited about it! Playtests this weekend. I will update with pictures and results.

3D Printing Extravaganza!

As many of you may know I love miniature war-games. Not that I play many of them these days – work, my Master’s program, and running around and creating havoc in¬†Omaha and the Continental United States take up most of my time. I wanted to go to a local shop, Orcs 4 Hire, and play a rousing game of Warhammer 40k…may not happen.

But I digress.

In my love for tabletop wargames I have the desire to create my own. This is no easy feat. Rules must be created, play tested, rewritten, play tested again, re-rewritten. Miniatures must be sculpted and then mass produced, they have to be packaged, and then a distribution system, paired with a marketing strategy, must be created.

But most of that is down the line. Right now working on the game is that “miniatures sculpted” section. Hiring a sculptor is expensive. Currently the quote is $400 PER MINI. $8000 is where we’re sitting if we pay a guy. And for a small start-up that can be debilitating.

There’s another option that has become more and more viable over the past few years: 3D printing.

3D printing has really taken off in the last decade. Instead of companies using giant machinery one can now purchase a desktop 3D printer for $3000 or less, and the plastic material is $50 or so a spool.

I give you MakerBot. MakerBot manufactures some excellent, affordable 3D printers for companies, or for the average user. The MakerBot Replicator is a rather affordable $1,749. http://store.makerbot.com/replicator-404.html

It’s upgraded sibling, the MakerBot Replicator 2, is a bit pricier at $2,199. http://store.makerbot.com/replicator2.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whichever model, they are a much cheaper alternative to paying a sculptor.

But there ARE drawbacks. Instead of having a sculptor do all the work, one (namely me) would have to learn to use CAD or the MakerBot program, MakerWare. This is time consuming, and not prefferable if working to meet a certain deadline, whether that be a shopping holiday season or pre-convention.

Still a bit expensive though? There are some great Kickstarter Campaigns pushing small, very affordable desktop 3D Printers. Like this one here:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/25111729/hyrel-3d-printer?ref=live

For a backing of $1,395 you can get a very nice, all metal 3D printer.

Creating your own miniatures, toys, or parts is more affordable than ever, and the entrepreneur-on-the-cheap that needs one for their operations can find a list of affordable 3D printers on the internet. It’s something I’m looking into, for sure.

Until next time . . .